Working in retirement

Working in retirement: what you need to know

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Plan to work in retirement? If so, you're not alone. Recent studies have consistently shown that a majority of retirees intend to work at least a portion of their retirement years. Here are some points to consider.

Why work during retirement?

If you work during retirement, you'll earn money and rely less on your retirement savings, leaving more to grow for the future. You may also have access to affordable health care, as many employers offer this important benefit to part-time employees. But there are also non-economic reasons for working during retirement. Many retirees work for personal fulfillment, to stay mentally and physically active, to enjoy the social benefits of working, and to try their hands at something new.

What about my Social Security benefits?

Working may enable you to postpone claiming Social Security. In general, the later you begin receiving benefit payments, the greater your benefit will be. Whether delaying the start of Social Security benefits is the right decision for you depends on your personal circumstances.

One factor to consider is whether you want to continue working after you start receiving Social Security retirement benefits, because your earnings may affect the amount of your payment.

If you've reached full retirement age (varies depending on when you were born), you don't need to worry — you can earn as much as you want without affecting your Social Security benefit. But if you haven't yet reached full retirement age, $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $2 you earn over the annual earnings limit ($16,920 in 2017). A higher earnings limit applies in the year you reach full retirement age. If you earn more than this higher limit ($44,880 in 2017), $1 in benefits will be withheld for every $3 you earn over that amount, until the month you reach full retirement age — then you'll get your full benefit no matter how much you earn. Yet another special rule applies in your first year of Social Security retirement — you'll get your full benefit for any month you earn less than 1/12 of the annual earnings limit ($1,410 in 2017) and you don't perform substantial services in self-employment.

Keep in mind, however, that Social Security benefits only increase by delaying up to age 70; thereafter, the benefit amount does not increase.

Not all income reduces your Social Security benefit. In general, Social Security only takes into account wages you've earned as an employee, net earnings from self-employment, and other types of work-related income such as bonuses, commissions, and fees. Pensions, annuities, IRA payments, and investment income won't reduce your benefit.

Even if some of your benefits are withheld prior to your full retirement age, you'll generally receive a higher monthly benefit starting at your full retirement age, because the Social Security Administration (SSA) will recalculate your benefit and give you credit for amounts that were withheld. If you continue to work, any new earnings may also increase your monthly benefit. The SSA reviews your earnings record every year to see if you had additional earnings that would increase your benefit.

One last important point to consider. In general, your Social Security benefit won't be subject to federal income tax if that's the only income you receive during the year. But if you work during retirement (or you receive any other taxable income or tax-exempt interest), a portion of your benefit may become taxable. IRS Publication 915 has a worksheet that can help you determine whether any part of your Social Security benefit is subject to income tax.

How will working affect a pension benefit?

Some employers have adopted "phased retirement" programs that allow you to ease into retirement by working fewer hours, while also allowing you to receive all or part of your pension benefit. However, other employers require that you fully retire before you can receive your pension. And some plans even require that your pension benefit be suspended if you retire and then return to work for the same employer, even part-time. Check with your plan administrator.

Associated Tags: Retirement

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Securities offered through Waddell & Reed, Inc., Member FINRA/SIPC, are not insured by FDIC, NCUA or any other government agency, are not deposits or obligations of the financial institution, are not guaranteed by the financial institution, and are subject to risks, including the possible loss of principal. Insurance products are offered through insurance companies with which Waddell & Reed has sales arrangements. Guarantees provided by insurance products are subject to the claims-paying-ability of the issuing insurance company.

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